InnerVision Advanced Medical Imaging Center - Unity Healthcare (2022)

About Us

InnerVision is an outpatient imaging center providing a full scope of radiology services to patients and physicians in North Central Indiana. InnerVision provides a pleasant outpatient experience, employs the very best clinical and support staff, and offers the latest medical imaging technology.

As an independently-owned imaging center, InnerVision is able to meet all of your imaging needs for less. Our goal is to deliver the highest level of patient care using the best technology available.

InnerVision is proud to be the Official Imaging Center for Purdue Athletics

InnerVision Advanced Medical Imaging Center - Unity Healthcare (1)

At InnerVision Advanced Medical Imaging Center, we are on the cutting edge of multiple imaging modalities. It is our goal to provide diagnostic imaging that will help you and your physician find answers to your medical concerns. At the same time, we understand that there is more to patient care than providing advanced technology. Our team prides itself on delivering you the most professional, compassionate care in a comfortable environment.

High Quality Imaging for Less.

InnerVision Advanced Medical Imaging Center - Unity Healthcare (2)Quality healthcare and affordability are equally important, and InnerVision offers both. We recognize that healthcare costs can be a burden, and there is no reason for you to pay more than necessary for the same services.

As an independent outpatient imaging center, InnerVision can meet all of your imaging needs for less. Our state-of-the-art center has equipment with unique features that are often found only in academic centers and teaching hospitals. We guarantee the highest level of patient care with utmost attention to quality, safety and value.

Call us today and we will tell you exactly what your imaging study will cost.

Our Philosophy

We never lose sight of the fact that what we are looking at is not images, but people.

We recognize the importance of what we do – it is often the basis for the treatment decisions that physicians make. That is why we only settle for the highest quality images.

Our goal is to optimize the cost-effective use of our technology by applying it appropriately, and to provide our customers with information that maximizes clinical decision-making.As part of the caregiving team, we invite referring physicians and other health care providers to consult with us in an effort to provide the highest level of patient care.

When you have an imaging exam performed at InnerVision Advanced Medical Imaging Center, your study is interpreted by one of our board-certified radiologists. Radiologists are physicians with special training in diagnostic imaging studies.

Our Team
  • Michael Conley, MD
  • John Fiederlein, MD
  • Peter Simmons, MD
  • Jennifer Bryant, MBA, MSN, RN, Director of Radiology/Administrator
  • Lance Madsen, MS, CIIP, Radiology Information Systems Administrator
  • Trudy Baumgartner, RN, Lead Nurse Manager
  • Susan Wiseman, Education Coding and Compliance

Testimonials

I had an MRI there at 1pm today. I was an anxious mess because I’m claustrophobic and hate having things on my face. Everyone there was amazing. They calmed my anxiety as soon as I walked in. The nurse who handled my sedation was absolutely wonderful. She was very sweet. She answered all of my questions without hesitation. Everyone was professional, but down to earth and not judgmental. I just wanted someone to know what a great experience I had. I know thank-you’s don’t come often, so I wanted to ensure that they know how grateful I am for the experience they provided. I have spread the word to people I know that it was a great experience. Thank you again, and God Bless.

– Jennifer S., January 2021

Services

InnerVision Advanced Medical Imaging Center is committed to providing you with the highest level of quality and service. Our Imaging Center houses equipment with unique features often found only in academic centers and teaching hospitals.

Types of Studies

MRI

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) exams are non-invasive diagnostic imaging exams of soft tissue, bone, and muscle – and have become one of the fastest growing types of medical diagnostic tests in the United States. With InnerVision’s recent installation of a MAGNETOM Altea 1.5 T MRI from Siemens Healthineers, patients can now experience faster, more comfortable exams.

The MAGNETOM Altea offers doctors an array of diagnostic possibilities and provides patients with a more comfortable experience.

Like all MRIs, the MAGNETOM Altea uses magnets that are measured in Tesla (T) to acquire images. At 1.5T, the MAGETOM Altea offers superb image quality that may be used for a wide range of medical needs – from orthopedic and sports-related injuries to breast cancer testing – and can help physicians make quicker, more accurate diagnoses.

The MAGNETOM Altea boasts a 70 cm open bore, which is the tube-like structure of an MRI machine, where the patient lies during the imaging process, and can provide access for obese patients of up to 550 pounds. Additionally, the system’s ultra-short bore helps alleviate concerns of claustrophobia since many exams can be performed with the patient’s head outside of the bore.

The system is also equipped with exclusive Siemens Healthineers technologies including Tim™ 4G and Dot (Day optimizing throughput). The combination of Tim and Dot improves the entire MRI workflow and delivers patient-centered care.

MRI is used to diagnose a variety of medical conditions. It is important that you follow all of the MRI Preparation Instructions if your doctors has ordered a MRI.

PET/CT

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive test that looks at biochemical and physiological changes in tissues related to metabolism. Computed Tomography (CT Scan) shows the structure of the anatomy. A PET/CT scan combines both a PET and a CT exam during a single outpatient exam and fuses the two types of images together. This highly sophisticated imaging technique gives detailed information to physicians about the presence or spread of disease and accurately identifies its precise location.

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A PET/CT is primarily used in detecting, staging and monitoring cancer. This type of imaging can be used to detect if a lung nodule is cancerous. In many cases, the results of a PET scan may prevent an unnecessary biopsy or surgery. PET scans can also be used to image various types of heart and brain disorders, such as early diagnoses of dementia.

It is important that you follow all of the PET/CT Preparation Instructions if your doctors has ordered a PET/CT.

CT

Computed Tomography (CT) scan is a painless, non-invasive imaging test that allows physicians to look inside various parts of the body. A CT scanner uses a special x-ray tube and detectors to produce detailed images. Unlike regular X-rays that look at only one part of the body, a CT scan looks at an entire area of the body, taking a “stack” of pictures, much like slices in a loaf of bread. Nearly any part of the body can be studied with a CT scan.

It is important that you follow all of the preparation instructions if your doctors has ordered a CT Scan.

Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine exams use very small amounts of radioactive agents to provide information about how various organs in the body are functioning. The substance is absorbed by different parts of the body and emits gamma rays that are detected by special types of cameras called gamma cameras and PET cameras. These cameras use powerful computers to form images that provide information about the area of the body being studied. The amount of radiation from most nuclear medicine exams is comparable to that of a regular x-ray exam.

Some of the most common nuclear medicine exams are used to scan the bones, gallbladder, heart, kidneys, and thyroid.

It is important that you follow all of the Nuclear Medicine Preparation Instructions if your doctors has ordered a Nuclear Medicine test.

Interventional Radiology (IR)

Interventional Radiology is a medical sub-specialty of radiology that uses minimally-invasive image-guided procedures to diagnose and support treatment of diseases in nearly every organ system. IR procedures are performed using needles and narrow tubes called catheters. Some examples include port placement, PICC, and Kyphoplasty.

Many conditions that once required surgery can now be treated non-surgically by interventional radiologists. By minimizing the physical trauma to the patient, these procedures can reduce infection rates and recovery time, and decrease time spent in the surgical facility.

IR procedures are performed in an outpatient surgery center or hospital. The facility will provide you with instructions prior to your procedure date.

Kyphoplasty

Kyphoplasty is an image-guided surgical procedure used to treat a fracture from osteoporosis. It is designed to stop the pain caused by a spinal fracture, to stabilize the spine, and to restore some or all of the lost body height due to the compression fracture.

During the procedure, the interventional radiologist places a narrow tube through a small incision in the back. The doctor uses fluoroscopy to guide the tube to the affected vertebrae. Then, the doctor inserts a balloon through the tube and into the affected vertebrae. The balloon is carefully inflated returning the vertebrae to normal position. The balloon is removed and the doctor uses a cement-like material to fill the cavity. It hardens quickly stabilizing the bone.

Some patients experience immediate relief after Kyphoplasty, while others report a reduction or elimination of pain within two days. Patients can return to their normal daily activities immediately. Strenuous exertion should be avoided until approved by your physician, approximately six weeks.

Ultrasound

An ultrasound is a safe, painless, non-invasive imaging test that uses the reflection of sound waves to obtain images of various parts of the body. While most people think of ultrasound as a test that is used to look at a developing baby, it has many other uses in the diagnosis of disease.

It is important that you follow all of the Ultrasound Preparation Instructions if your doctors has ordered an Ultrasound.

Bone Densitometry

Bone densitometry or DEXA uses very low amounts of x-ray to measure your bone density. It is a fast, safe and painless test that can assess your risk of developing osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is the gradual thinning and weakening of the bones, which can lead to bone fractures. Over 28 million Americans, 80% of whom are women, have or are at risk of developing this condition. Unfortunately, most individuals have no symptoms until they suffer a painful bone fracture.

X-ray/Fluoroscopy

X-ray exams are the mainstay of diagnostic imaging. They offer an accurate look inside the body to uncover anatomic problems. X-rays are commonly used on bones and joints, chests, spine and abdomen. InnerVision offers digital radiography, which provides better images, lessens the radiation dose, and provides a higher quality of care.

Fluoroscopy allows the radiologist to view the image in real time. It is most often used for joint injections and other related studies.

Because the test uses radiation, pregnant women should avoid x-rays. InnerVision can recommend an alternative test that will be safe for your growing baby.

It is important that you follow all of the X-ray Preparation Instructions if your doctors has ordered an X-ray.

Screening for Osteoporosis

Q: Who should have an imaging DEXA scan?

A:All women over 65 years old, regardless of risk factors; postmenopausal women with one or more risk factors for osteoporosis; women who have been on hormone replacement therapy for prolonged periods; and all postmenopausal women who have had a broken bone should have their bone density tested.

Q: What are the risk factors for osteoporosis?

A:There are many risk factors, including:

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  • Increased age.
  • Women are at much greater risk since they have less bone tissue to begin with and lose it more rapidly due to changes after menopause.
  • Caucasian and Asian women are at increased risk.
  • Small boned and thinner women are at increased risk.
  • Smoking currently or in the past.
  • Low calcium intake.
  • Excess alcohol intake.
  • Getting little weight-bearing exercise.
  • Family history of broken bones or osteoporosis.
  • Early menopause, either naturally or due to surgery.
  • Certain medications (such as steroids, lithium, anticonvulsants, or any anti-estrogen medications).
  • Certain medical conditions (such as endometriosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and certain hormone disorders).

Q: Are there any symptoms that indicate I may have osteoporosis?

A:While osteoporosis is called the “silent disease” since bone loss can occur without symptoms, some of the outward signs of this disease include loss of height, certain types of back pain, and an upper back that is curved forward. Unfortunately, many first realize they have osteoporosis when they break a bone, such as the wrist, spine or hip.

Q: What can be done if I am found to have osteoporosis?

A:There are certain medications that your doctor can prescribe that can help treat this condition. Studies have shown that certain medications reduce the risk of fractures by 30-50% in treated groups. InnerVision interventional radiologists perform Kyphoplasty to treat spine fractures caused by osteoporosis.

Q: Why is early diagnosis important?

A:Early diagnosis leads to treatment, which can help prevent fractures. Fractures of bones, especially the hip, are a serious complication of osteoporosis. More than 90% of hip fractures are related to osteoporosis. Hip fractures also result in over 50,000 deaths each year and in an impaired lifestyle in over half of patients.

Q: Will my insurance cover the cost of a DEXA scan?

A:The Bone Measurement Act of 1998 mandates that Medicare pay for periodic bone densitometry. Most private insurance companies also pay for DEXA scans. InnerVision recommends that you talk with your insurance company to see if you are covered.

Q: How much radiation exposure is there with a DEXA scan?

A:Very little. The amount of radiation a patient receives from a DEXA scan is about 1/10th that of a chest x-ray. This is comparable to the naturally occurring radiation you are exposed to in one week.

Clinical Research

Advancing clinical research to benefit patients is critical in order to continue to bring more advanced, and better treatment strategies to patients. InnerVision participates in various clinical trials. Examples of some of the trials we have participated in include:

  • CT/MRI testing for joint replacements
  • Equipment testing for MRI related to tesla strength
  • Tooling testing for industrial needs with CT
  • Clinical trials for oncology

Participation in a clinical trial is always optional. You will never be enrolled without your full consent. Our staff may present you with an opportunity to participate if there is a clinical trial that we think may be right for you. For more information about Clinical Research at InnerVision, call 765.446.5150 to speak directly to the Director of Radiology.

Patients

Thank you for choosing InnerVision Advanced Medical Imaging Center. We look forward to caring for you. The following information is important so we can provide high quality care for all of our patients.

Walk-ins: All imaging studies require an appointment. Please call during regular business hours to schedule.

Cancellations: Please call at least 24 hours in advance to cancel an appointment.

Payment: We take the same insurance as other Unity partners. Some insurance plans require that you meet a deductible before they pay while others require a co-pay for visits. Please contact your insurance company to understand your financial responsibility. We collect co-pays at the time of service.

What to Bring: Please bring your insurance card(s), photo ID, the physician order, and any prior imaging that is relevant.

What Not to Bring: For most studies, you will be asked to remove jewelry and watches. Although we do provide lockers, it is best to leave valuables at home.

What to Expect: Each imaging study is different. Please refer to the Preparing for Your Imaging Study hyperlink to that section on site to better understand the study your doctor has prescribed.

Pregnant or Nursing: Some imaging studies can harm your unborn baby and/or newborn. Please inform our staff if you are pregnant, could be pregnant, or are nursing your baby.

Preparing for Your Imaging Study

For all imaging studies, please tell your doctor and InnerVision prior to your test if you are pregnant, think you may be pregnant, or are a nursing mother.

MRI

Preparation Instructions
Some MRI exams use a special dye, called intravenous contrast. Patients receiving the dye will be asked to refrain from eating or drinking for several hours prior to the exam. If you are not receiving the dye with your exam, there is no special prep.

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Important Notes
If you have had MRI dye in the past and have been told that you had a “reaction” to it (such as hives), please notify your doctor and InnerVision as soon as possible. MRI dye is NOT the same as CT scan dye or X-ray dye.

Due to the strong magnetic field in an MRI, please call InnerVision if you have had a pacemaker, aneurysm clip, nerve stimulator, indwelling medication pump (like insulin), or inner ear (cochlear) device inserted and it is still present, or if you have had any metal object placed inside your body during your lifetime. We also need to know if any metal has ever gotten into your eyes and not been removed by a physician. If you have had an implant, please bring your implant card with you so the technologist can assess if the implant is safe in the MRI environment.

What to Expect

  1. You will change into scrubs and may have an IV line started, if necessary.
  2. Due to the MRI magnet, you will be asked to remove jewelry and place it along with your credit cards into a locker.
  3. You will be placed on the MRI table and offered ear plugs or headphones to protect your hearing because the magnet in the MRI makes noise while operating.
  4. The technologist will take a series of pictures.
  5. The technologist may come back into the room to start the injection of intravenous dye. Additional images will be obtained after the dye is injected.
  6. Once the imaging is complete, you will leave the room and have your IV removed, if necessary, before departing.
  7. Your images will be reviewed by one of our board certified radiologists who will issue a timely report to your doctor.

PET/CT

Preparation Instructions

  • No food for six hours prior to your exam time. You are encouraged to drink as much water as possible to arrive well hydrated.
  • Avoid all beverages with caffeine, alcohol and sugar.
  • DoNOTchew gum or have any hard candy the day of the exam as these can interfere with exam results.
  • Take any prescribed medications on the day of your test unless told otherwise.
  • No smoking on the day of your exam.
  • Drink at least 2 to 4 large glasses (12 oz.) of water before the scan. You do not have to arrive with a full bladder.
  • Wear comfortable clothing without any metal on them (no zippers, snaps, etc.) and leave all jewelry at home.
  • Tell your doctor if you are diabetic or could be pregnant.
  • Do not perform any strenuous activity or exercise the day of your exam. Muscle activity can interfere with the results of your exam.

What to Expect

  1. The technologist will inject you with a PET imaging agent, which is a sugar molecule combined with a radioisotope.
  2. After the injection, you will sit in a comfortable chair in a quiet room for about one hour while the agent distributes throughout your body.
  3. You will be placed on the PET scan table and a series of pictures will be taken. Scanning usually takes 20-25 minutes, unless your physician ordered a whole body scan, which requires approximately 45 minutes.
  4. The images will be reviewed by one of our board certified radiologists who may request additional pictures before allowing you to leave.
  5. The radiologist will issue a timely report to your doctor.

CT Scan

Preparation Instructions
Since a CT exam may require the use of a special iodinated contrast media, called intravenous contrast, please do not eat or drink anything for 3 hours prior to arrival.

Important Note
If you have had intravenous dye in the past and have been told that you had a “reaction” to it (such as hives), please notify your doctor and InnerVision as soon as possible. Any patient with a history of anaphylaxis reaction to any medication should contact us prior to testing.

What to Expect

  1. You will change into scrubs and may have an IV line started, if necessary.
  2. Depending on the type of exam being done, you may be asked to drink 32 ounces of an oral contrast media. If given oral contrast media, you will have a 60-75 minute wait to allow the iodinated contrast media to move through the gastrointestinal tract.
  3. You will be placed on the CT table and the technologist will take a series of pictures.
  4. The technologist will come back into the room to start the injection of the intravenous contrast media, if needed. It is normal for the contrast media to give you a warm sensation. This usually passes in a minute or so. Additional images will be obtained after the dye is injected.
  5. During this part of the study, you may be given breathing instructions and the CT table may move as images are being captured.
  6. Once the imaging is complete, you will leave the room and have your IV removed, if necessary, before departing.
  7. Your images will be reviewed by one of our board certified radiologists who will issue a timely report to your doctor.

Nuclear Medicine

Preparation Instructions
Preparation depends on the type of nuclear medicine study that is being conducted. Please follow the preparation instructions for your prescribed study.

Bone Scan:You will need to be well hydrated for this exam. You should drink as much fluid as possible before the exam. No other special preparation is needed.

Bone-Indium Scan:You will have a small sample of blood drawn the morning of the exam. This will be labeled and reinjected in the afternoon. The scan will be performed the next day. You should drink as much fluid as possible before the exam.

HIDA (Gallbladder) Scan:Since food and drink in the stomach can alter the results of the exam, do not eat or drink for at least 6 hours before the exam. You should also not take any prescribed narcotic pain medications the day of the exam since this can alter the test results.

Muga Scan (Heart Exam):No Prep. A small injection is given that tags the patient’s red blood cells. Following a 30-minute wait, another injection is given of the radioisotope followed by a single 10-minute image.

Renal Imaging:Test preparation will vary depending on the age of the patient and type of exam being performed. Contact InnerVision at 765.447.7447 for specific instructions.

Thyroid Uptake and Imaging:You will need to stop taking thyroid-related medications for a period of time prior to your imaging study. This should be discussed with your doctor. You should not eat seafood or take multivitamins for one week prior to your test. You should have nothing to eat or drink for 6 hours before the exam.

What to Expect

  1. You will change into scrubs
  2. The technologist will inject the radioactive agent, if necessary.
  3. You may go directly to the table, or you may have to wait for the agent to distribute throughout your body before imaging can begin. In these cases, you will be asked to return to complete the exam. Here is how long you can expect to wait for the second portion of the exam:

Bone Scan Bone Scan (3-phase) Gallbladder (HIDA) Renal Scan (Lasix) Thyroid Uptake/Scan Muga Scan 3 Hrs Immediately and @ 3 Hrs Immediately Immediately Next day 30 Minutes

Type of ExamWhen Imaging Begins (After Injection)
Bone Scan;3 Hrs
Bone Scan (3-phase)Immediately and @ 3 Hrs
Gallbladder (HIDA)Immediately
Renal Scan (Lasix)Immediately
Thyroid Uptake/ScanNext day
Muga Scan30 Minutes
  1. Imaging can last up to 90 minutes.
  2. The images will be reviewed by one of our board certified radiologists who may request additional pictures before allowing you to leave.
  3. The radiologist will issue a timely report to your doctor.

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Ultrasound

Preparation Instructions
Preparation depends on the type of ultrasound study that is being conducted. Please follow the preparation instructions for your prescribed study.

Abdominal/Aorta Ultrasound: Nothing to eat or drink for 8 hours prior to the exam..

Renal Ultrasound (onlykidneys):No special prep is needed.

Renal Artery Doppler Study (look for causes of high blood pressure in the kidneys):Nothing to eat or drink for 8 hours prior to the exam except drink 32-40 ounces of water 90 minutes prior to the exam. You may empty your bladder prior to the exam.

Pelvis/OB Ultrasound: Drink 32-36 ounces of water 90 minutes prior to the exam. This must be completed within a 45-minute time period. Do not empty your bladder until the exam is completed.

Thyroid or Parathyroid:No prep necessary

Testicular (Scrotum):No prep necessary

Venous Doppler (Leg or arm veins):No prep necessary

Carotid Doppler:No prep necessary

Paracentesis:The radiologists will use ultrasound to help drain fluid from the abdominal cavity. Blood work may be required prior to this as indicated by your physician. No other prep is needed.

What to Expect

  1. For most exams, you will not need to change out of your clothes.
  2. While on the table, warmed ultrasound gel is placed over the areas to be scanned. This provides a good link between the ultrasound probe and your internal organs.
  3. The technologist will then take a series of images and will label these and take measurements of normal structures.
  4. The images will be reviewed by one of our radiologists who may request additional pictures before allowing you to leave.
  5. Your images will be reviewed by one of our board certified radiologists who will issue a timely report to your doctor.

X-ray

Preparation Instructions
Preparation depends on the type of x-ray study that is being conducted. Please follow the preparation instructions for your prescribed study.

Upper GI / Esophagus / Small Bowel:Nothing to eat or drink after midnight. May take usual medications with a sip of water.

Myelogram:Light breakfast the morning of exam. Increase fluids the night before and morning of the procedure. If you are taking a blood thinner, such as Coumadin, please notify InnerVision.

Arthrograms:If you are taking blood thinners, such as Coumadin, please notify InnerVision.

Biopsies:Nothing to eat or drink for 4 hours prior to the procedure. If you are taking blood thinners, such as Coumadin, please notify InnerVision.

Sialogram:Nothing to eat or drink for four hours prior to the procedure. May take usual medications.

Other x-rays: No prep necessary.

Important Notes

  • X-ray exams use radiation so pregnant women should avoid this test. Please notify us if there is a chance you may be pregnant so we can consider alternative imaging studies.
  • The clarity of the x-ray image decreases with increasing weight and the x-ray exam tables were constructed with weight limits because of the moveable top. The established weight limit is 462 lbs. Please contact us if you are over the weight limit for alternative imaging options.

What to Expect

  1. Depending on the part being scanned, it may not be necessary to change out of your clothes.
  2. While on the table, the part of the body to be imaged is placed against the image receptor.
  3. You will be asked to hold still or hold your breath while the technologist takes a series of images.
  4. Your images will be reviewed by one of our board certified radiologists who will issue a timely report to your doctor.
Patient Portal

Manage Your Imaging Studies Online
InnerVision is pleased to offer our patients the latest tool in personal health care management.

Nucleus is an electronic medical record of your imaging studies performed at InnerVision. It provides you with a secure and convenient way to manage your personal health care online. This free, self-service tool can improve interactions with your doctor’s office and offers more convenience for our patients.

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